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Common Hair Care Myths

“Brush your hair with 100 strokes before bed every night to keep it smooth.” “Eat Jello to help your hair grow faster.” There are so many myths about hair care circulating, whether they’re old wives’ tales or rumors on the Internet. So how do you know which are worth trying and which are just tall tales? Here are a few to be mindful of.

 

hair care mythsBrushing your hair 100 times every night will make it silky smooth. This is probably the number one hair care myth going. There is some truth to it, but it’s exaggerated to say the least. Brushing your hair 100 times was at one time thought to increase blood circulation, encouraging your hair follicles to work and help you achieve stronger, shinier hair. While a thorough brushing is an excellent way to detangle your hair and distribute natural oils from root to tip, excessive brushing is more damaging to your hair than anything else, and should definitely be avoided.

 

 

Washing your hair every day will dry it out and damage it. Definitely do not follow the instructions on the shampoo bottle that prompt you to “lather, rinse, repeat.” The only people those benefit are the shampoo manufacturers. While washing your hair too often strips it of its natural oils and will leave it dry and damaged, it is okay to wash daily in the right circumstances. Women who have shorter styles that require heavier hair products, or anyone who lives in the city, tend to prefer to wash their hair every day. If you like to as well, just choose a gentle shampoo. Once a month, switch it for a clarifying shampoo that will get rid of any buildup.

 

Eating Jello or taking prenatal vitamins will help your hair grow in stronger and faster. It is absolutely true that eating a nutritious diet and drinking water is good for your hair, and brittle or thinning hair can be indicative of poor eating habits. Beyond that, suggestions of what to eat or drink are more fiction than fact. There is no scientific evidence supporting the notion that eating gelatin products will make your hair grow. Furthermore, while hair can become stronger or more lustrous during pregnancy, it’s due to hormonal fluctuations, not taking prenatal vitamins. Spend your money on fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods instead. Your hair, and your body, will thank you for it.

 

Before you buy into the latest hair care myth, do a little research. Quite often, suggestions are based on facts but have being distorted over time. Get to the “root” of the advice before you try anything new or waste your money on a so-called miracle cure.

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Josh Matthews

My name is Josh Matthews and I am 53 years old and live in Miami. I have two kids, one boy and one girl with my wife Linda. My son Jon is now 19 years old and in College. My daughter Jennifer is 14 and still in High-School. We also have a dog. When I don't work in the marketing department of a health company, I like to spend time outdoors with my family and friends. I don't do as much sport as I should but my family and me go on a skiing vacation at least once a year.

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Dealing with thinning hair

About the author

I am 53 years old and live in Miami. I have two kids, one boy and one girl with my wife Linda. My son Jon is now 19 years old and in College. My daughter Jennifer is 14 and still in High-School. We also have a dog. When I don’t work in the marketing department of a health company, I like to spend time outdoors with my family and friends. I don’t do as much sport as I should but my family and me go on a skiing vacation at least once a year.

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