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Male Hair Loss Patterns

In 1975, Dr. O’tar Norwood, published a standardized definition establishing a world wide classification in naming the two most common patterns in male pattern baldness. Along with this, he also named several other less common types related to similar conditions predominant to male pattern baldness as well. It is within these classification that hair specialists and doctors that deal with certain hair conditions, base their over all evaluation and approach prior to addressing the proper procedure of applying the needed clinical treatment in regards to male pattern baldness and hair loss.

norwood_fig1

Class I – This condition is related to adolescent or juvenile receding hairline conditions. It does not necessarily mean an immediate progress resulting to baldness at this stage in the case of the hairline starting above the beyond normal position in regard to the age of the individual.

Class II – This can be easily be indicated with proportion to the eye brow’s crease measuring at a fingers length up to the present position of the hairline. This is usually a condition that starts between the age of the early 30′s and the early 40′s for males. This is normal according to specialists and does not classify as the start of male pattern baldness.

Class III – This is considered as the first sign of clinical baldness. It can be defined as the real start of the manifestation of hair loss and can be determined by the loss of hair or the deepening of the temporal regions of the hairline. The temporal region are the opposite end of the hairline and are the first to manifest the signs of hair loss. As hair loss progresses, the temporal regions deepen further upward, going towards the backside of the head. This can be seen as like that of the letter “M”.

Class III Vertex – This is another Class III condition that involves the onset of hair loss on the top most part of the crown (Vertex) of the head. Unlike the first case condition, it can not be easily visible at a first glance since it usually begins on the top most part of the head and you may need an extra mirror to see the actual condition.

Class IV – This classification is best described as an apparent disappearance of most of the hairs on the top most crown of the head. Its characteristics imply a remaining growth of strands from the original vertex (crown) that still exists, giving it a sparse evident appearance of baldness.

Class V – This condition is the progression from the Class IV condition in which the remaining sparse strands of hair have totally receded. The obvious manifestation of the visible balding area of the crown and the hairlines are almost viewed as one,

Class VI – This condition can be defined as the total loss of all remaining hairs on the crown. The crown has totally lost all visible growth of hair, thus exposing the whole front and top most region of the head. The only visible hair growth that remains unaffected at this point will be that of the sides of the head.

Class VII – This is the final stages of male pattern baldness which can be defined as the total disappearance of all remaining hair from the front, crown and to some extent, as far as the backside of the head. The remaining hair growth on the sides of the head may well be sparse as well.

alopecia

Dr. O’tar Norwood based his classifications in regards to the most common patterns found in men with male pattern baldness. However, there are also diffused unpatterned hair loss conditions that do not fall within his published clinical studies. The genetic cause of hair loss in men that contributes to male pattern baldness is very hard to determine in regards to finding the adequate solution for clinical evaluations since it is not easy to make constructive diagnosis from clinical data such as these.

Diffused Patterned Alopecia and Diffused Unpatterned Alopecia are both predisposed genetic condition, most of the time hereditary in origin. It is the first imperative to fully understand the origin of it’s symptoms before proceeding to any sort of medical treatment. Diffused Patterned Alopecia (DPA) falls under Dr. O’tar Norwood’s classification. However, Diffused Unpatterned Alopecia (DUPA) has no predictable pattern to begin with and could even start to manifest just about in any part of the head.

DPA and DUPA patients that would want to undergo hair transplant are faced with certain issues regarding the procedure’s chances of being successful. DPA candidate are often times successful when undergoing hair transplant as opposed to DUPA candidates. DUPA face an uncertainty in regards to hair transplant procedures for reasons of their unstable genetic disposition.

 

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Josh Matthews

My name is Josh Matthews and I am 53 years old and live in Miami. I have two kids, one boy and one girl with my wife Linda. My son Jon is now 19 years old and in College. My daughter Jennifer is 14 and still in High-School. We also have a dog. When I don't work in the marketing department of a health company, I like to spend time outdoors with my family and friends. I don't do as much sport as I should but my family and me go on a skiing vacation at least once a year.

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Dealing with thinning hair

About the author

I am 53 years old and live in Miami. I have two kids, one boy and one girl with my wife Linda. My son Jon is now 19 years old and in College. My daughter Jennifer is 14 and still in High-School. We also have a dog. When I don’t work in the marketing department of a health company, I like to spend time outdoors with my family and friends. I don’t do as much sport as I should but my family and me go on a skiing vacation at least once a year.

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